#!/bin/sh
date > log ; sleep 57 ; echo
LIMIT=15 ; for ((a=1; a <= LIMIT ; a++)) do
ntptime | grep c7 >> log ; sleep 0.4 ; done
exit
With using the 'at', the script started at 00:59 CET.
Sun Jan  1 00:59:00 CET 2006
  time c76199fd.88d20000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:57.534, (.534454),
  time c76199fd.f0ee5000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:57.941, (.941136),
  time c76199fe.59243000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:58.348, (.348208),
  time c76199fe.c14ff000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:58.755, (.755126),
  time c76199ff.297f9000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:59.162, (.162103),
  time c76199ff.91b21000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:59.569, (.569123),
  time c76199ff.f9e5b000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:59.976, (.976161),
  time c76199ff.6214f000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:59.383, (.383132),
  time c76199ff.ca47a000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  0:59:59.790, (.790155),
  time c7619a00.3275d000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  1:00:00.197, (.197110),
  time c7619a00.9aaa8000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  1:00:00.604, (.604164),
  time c7619a01.02dd2000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  1:00:01.011, (.011187),
  time c7619a01.6b0d1000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  1:00:01.418, (.418168),
  time c7619a02.737f0000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  1:00:02.451, (.451157),
  time c7619a02.dbb82000  Sun, Jan  1 2006  1:00:02.858, (.858278),
The kernel does step the clock one second backward at the start of the leap second, i.e. they run through 0:59:59 CET twice.